Article 13220

Title of the article

INFLUENCE OF SENSOR DEPRIVATION BY FLOAT THERAPY METHODS ON HUMAN EMOTIONAL HEALTH INDICATORS,
STRESS RESISTANCE AND ARTERIAL PRESSURE LEVEL (LITERATURE REVIEW) 

Authors

Moiseeva Inessa Yakovlevna, Doctor of medical sciences, professor, head of the sub-department of general and clinical pharmacology, dean of the faculty of medicine, Medical Institute, Penza State University (40 Krasnaya street, Penza, Russia), E-mail: moiseeva_pharm@mail.ru
Mel'nikov Viktor L'vovich, Doctor of medical sciences, associate professor, head of the sub-department of microbiology, epidemiology and infectious diseases, Medical Institute, Penza State University (40 Krasnaya street, Penza, Russia), E-mail: KMC-pgu@yandex.ru
Dement'eva Renata Evgen'evna, Candidate of medical sciences, associate professor, sub-department of internal diseases, Medical Institute, Penza State University (40 Krasnaya street, Penza, Russia), E-mail: rdementyeva@gmail.com
Bibarsova Aliya Mukhamedzhanovna, Candidate of medical sciences, associate professor, sub-department of internal diseases, Medical Institute, Penza State University (40 Krasnaya street, Penza, Russia), E-mail: pgu-vb2004@mail.ru
Meshcheryakova Yuliya Sergeevna, Assistant, sub-department of general and clinical pharmacology, Medical Institute, Penza State University (40 Krasnaya street, Penza, Russia), E-mail: yulya.mescheriackowa@yandex.ru 

Index UDK

616.89-008.454, 616.12-008.331.1 

DOI

10.21685/2072-3032-2020-2-13 

Abstract

Floating or floating therapy, or float therapy (the English-language literature uses the term Flotation-REST from eng. float – free to swim, hold on to the surface, REST – Restricted Environmental Stimulation Therapy) – a method of physical exposure to the human body is based on sensory deprivation. Float therapy is the immersion of a person in a closed reservoir with plenum air exchange (float chamber) filled with water with extremely high salt concentration, resulting in the shutdown of stimulating environmental influences. Restricted Environmental Stimulation Therapy (REST therapy) is a method used to achieve deep relaxation and subsequent positive effects on emotional health through relaxation and disconnection from the outside environment. This review presents estimates of the potentially positive health effects of float therapy, including stress reduction and blood pressure reduction. Active study and use of float therapy for therapeutic and preventive purposes marks several stages. The first stage is the use of a float camera in the system of preparing space pilots for the real overload experienced in space flight. The second – complex preparation of professional athletes for competitive stage with subsequent rehabilitation, including event on rehabilitation after injuries. The third is the routine use of float therapy as a physical exposure factor in the integrated treatment of patients with diseases that are associated with external stress. The results of the studies show a decrease in stress, a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure due to a decrease in sympathetic influence due to deep relaxation in the float chamber. Flotation – REST has a beneficial effect on an individual 's emotional health, so this method has potential as an additional method in the integrated treatment of stress-related diseases. 

Key words

flotation – therapy, REST therapy, float – therapy, REST, sensory deprivation, blood pressure, stress, relaxation, emotional health 

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Дата создания: 23.06.2020 08:50
Дата обновления: 29.06.2020 13:58